Arriving At The Beginning

Much of what we call ‘waking up’ or ‘enlightenment’ is really just about our finally becoming comfortable with living paradox, which is to say living as paradox.

Our usual modality is to live through the screen of the mind with its beliefs, judgments and preconceptions. Awakening isn’t really a choice so much as it is a conscious recognition of that which is happening regardless. What is it that is finally real? Who is this one to whom we attribute all of these thoughts, experiences and memories?

These are answers you will not find in any book.

When you awaken to the truth of who you are, you aren’t in a state of knowing or unknowing, rather you are in a state of authenticity. This becomes self-evident, because no further question emerges. Even calling it a state does not adequately pull together the breadth of awareness that transcends all states.

It isn’t something new that you come across. It is always immediately available as the closest truth of who you are. It can’t be an object of knowledge. There isn’t a separate someone to figure it out, and there really isn’t anything to figure out.

Our various traditions have played a part in advertising awakening as some kind of permanent removal from the challenges of earthly existence, in which we are removed to some distant heaven or nirvana in a perfected state. The trouble with this view is that our freedom is very intimately linked with our authentic engagement with this moment, wherever it is that we happen to find ourselves. In one sense, our ground of being is so ordinary we do not see it and we therefore completely take it for granted.

We have also inherited a notion of someone who as awakened to their true nature as being someone who has ‘arrived’ on a spiritual level, which is really another extension of the dream state.

These people can easily become attributed with all kinds of projected virtues and assumptions. This invariably leads to much confusion and disillusionment.

It is intoxicating to the ego to imagine that people have crossed over the threshold in this way, and the allure that we too could also achieve this, on the implicit condition that we follow instructions carefully and repeat the program step by step. In other words, if we act and behave just right, we will get it. Can you think of any other field of human life this condition has been promoted?

This is a remarkably dangerous misunderstanding. Everyone has seen the effects of this in our world. We worship those we think have made it, and this attitude filters down into every facet of life until our entire worldview and life structure is dictated by the insatiable need to arrive. The big ways are easier to see, but what about the small ways in which we give away our freedom?

For example, allowing others to decide when we are happy or upset, or placing our sense of worth in the eyes of others – as though we even knew what they were seeing!

This is all a very elaborate, coherent, and above all convincing illusion, and it is one we have all bought into at some point. Some of us continue to pay the subscription to this worldview, while others among us have grown to see it as flimsy and untenable, but are not really quite sure what could replace it as a foundation.

This brings us to awakening to yourself as awareness, which is simply the withdrawal of identity from the pervasive illusions of the mind-ego, and quite literally, coming to your senses.

This withdrawal from illusion is actually easy in principle. You simply stop investing your energy in what you recognise to be illusory. The mechanism is quite simple, only it requires a lot of honesty which is usually leveraged upon the total dissatisfaction with the consensus of illusory beliefs which form the status quo. The difficulty comes from the tendency to withdraw from illusion being quite painful, at least initially. It can very often lead to pain in the same way that recovering from a foolish investment can be painful, because often there is a great degree of investment by way of time, money and resources.

When there is only who you truly are, then what will end is the mind’s fascination with the mythologised ‘other’ which is always frustratingly just out of your reach. Your hunger for spiritual attainment will naturally retire, and you will accommodate no opinion of yourself – yours nor anyone elses, because you will know that in the final analysis, none of this touches who you truly are.

This is not a theory, but an experiential transition. Be forewarned – you will not gain anything. In fact, you will lose your fictional world, and you will know your place humbly amongst your brothers and sisters. The only part of you that desires reconnection with what is real is the only part of you that is real.

We are so hungry for the imagined reality of this success that we will often bargain away nearly anything in the transaction, including our honesty, our integrity, our happiness and well-being.

People are often quite prepared to allow themselves to be brainwashed by whoever they have delegated authority to on the condition that they will be allowed to partake in their share of glory.

The discovery of who you are is the termination of the primary identity pursuit, and the ending of the persistent denial of one’s own inherent freedom and worth. Awakening is the end of existential insanity.

Fortunately, you never need to worry about trying to figure out who you truly are. All you need to do is to stop energizing every thought and movement away from your natural state, and witness that which is right in front of you. Your arrival at the beginning is simultaneously to comprehend the nature of the end. This unspeakable depth of experience is what is hinted at in the symbol of the ouroboros, the serpent eternally swallowing his own tail.

It is one thing to believe that there is neither beginning nor ending, but another thing entirely to bring forth that truth within your experience. This is the sacred invitation to living paradox. You must eventually come to arrive at the point that you always were. How could you do otherwise? What else is there worth doing? All that it requires is the complete willingness to forfeit every idea of who and what you are – just for one moment.

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Simon P Murphy is a Nelson-based esotericist and philosopher, and author of His Master’s Wretched Organ, a brilliant collection of weird fiction stories.

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If you enjoyed reading this essay/article, you can get a compilation of the Best VJMP Essays and Articles from 2021 from Amazon for Kindle or Amazon for CreateSpace (for international readers), or TradeMe (for Kiwis). A compilation of the Best VJMP Essays and Articles of 2019, the Best VJMP Essays and Articles of 2018 and the Best VJMP Essays and Articles of 2017 are also available.

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An Exhaustive List Of All The Times Clown World Chronicles Mentions ‘Jew’, ‘Jews’ or ‘Jewish’

Having just had my right to free expression violated by TradeMe because of an accusation that one of my works, Clown World Chronicles, contained “antisemitic and racist content”, I felt obliged to defend myself in this article.

The fact is that my work – one of political humour, not “intolerance, hatred or violence” – mentions ‘Jew’, ‘Jews’ or ‘Jewish’ only 12 times, and none of those times are in an antisemitic or racist context.

1 (Chapter 25): “The universalist creed of Christianity declares that ‘there is neither Jew nor Greek’, and the Christcuck takes that to mean that borders are against the will of God.”

A simple quote from the Christian Bible – not antisemitic.

2 (Chapter 26): “It’s possible to simp for women, for blacks, for Muslims, Jews or Christians, for drug users, for homosexuals, for rednecks, for children.”

Explaining the fact that it’s possible to simp for Jews – not antisemitic.

3 (Chapter 32): “The nightmare scenario is that another Hitler rises up to channel the incel rage against their enemies. The original Nazi movement was partially motivated by the everyday man’s horror at how slutty and degenerate the everyday fräulein had become under the Weimar Republic, and a future totalitarian movement could use incel rage to gain power. A new Hitler could blame Jewish media influence for why young men can’t get laid any more.”

Explaining the fact that a new Hitler would likely blame Jewish media influence – not antisemitic.

4 (Chapter 37): “Nazihippies don’t care about Jews beyond a general dislike of Abrahamism, and a general preference for non-Semitic spiritual traditions.”

Pointing out that nazihippies are indifferent to Jews – not antisemitic.

5, 6 (Chapter 38): “One of the reasons why Hitler was able to summon so much rage against Jews was because of the widespread belief in Germany that Jewish men had played a disproportionate role in the buying and selling of these child prostitutes.”

Stating a historical fact about why Hitler won so much support – not antisemitic.

7 (Chapter 39): “The most difficult thing to grasp about all this is why white people are doing it to themselves. It isn’t easy to understand why – it seems at least masochistic, if not outright suicidal. This has caused a number of conspiracy theories to arise, including the usual anti-Jewish ones.”

Here the book specifically decries anti-Jewish conspiracy theories – not antisemitic.

8 (Chapter 41): “Sometimes it is said that, when the Day of the Rope comes, there will be no more liberals/globalists/Marxists/Jews/Trump supporters. In such statements one can hear an echo of the sentiments that inspired the Drang nach Osten. This is the great, unspoken danger inherent in Clown World: that the suffering caused to people by the ineptitude of their ruling classes could find expression in mass murder.”

Pointing out the established historical fact that incompetent democracies set the stage for the rise of authoritarianism – not antisemitic.

9, 10 (Chapter 46): “If all of the Jews were kicked out of the West, the niches that they currently occupy would end up being filled by white people. Evidence for this comes from the fact that Japan and South Korea have also descended into Clown World, in many ways even worse than what the West has. But Japan and South Korea already are ethnostates, with hardly a Jew to be seen anywhere.”

Here the book explicitly states that Jews are not to blame for Clown World – not antisemitic.

11, 12 (Chapter 83): “Although the Merchant has a Jewish appearance, this is incidental. The ugliness of the Merchant is not because he is Jewish but because he represents the ugliness within all of us.”

Here the book states that the ugliness of a popular cartoon meme is not because the figure is Jewish – not antisemitic.

Those are the only 12 times the book references ‘Jew’, ‘Jews’ or ‘Jewish’, in 300 pages. Nowhere in any of those 12 references is there any call to violence, intolerance or hatred. Nowhere in Clown World Chronicles is there any evidence of that which I have been accused of, accusations which saw my right to free expression and my ability to put bread on the table for my family stripped from me.

How a book that explicitly decries anti-Jewish conspiracy theories, and which explicitly rejects blaming Jews for Clown World, can be banned for antisemitism would be a mystery, if we didn’t already know we were living in Clown World.

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Clown World Chronicles is the definitive guide to the insanity of life in the post-Industrial West.

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If you enjoyed reading this essay/article, you can get a compilation of the Best VJMP Essays and Articles from 2021 from Amazon for Kindle or Amazon for CreateSpace (for international readers), or TradeMe (for Kiwis). A compilation of the Best VJMP Essays and Articles of 2019, the Best VJMP Essays and Articles of 2018 and the Best VJMP Essays and Articles of 2017 are also available.

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Understanding New Zealand 3: Demographics and Voting Patterns of Euthanasia Referendum Voters

The euthanasia referendum took place at the same time as the cannabis referendum. It attracted much less attention than the cannabis one, probably because a vote in favour of reform appeared to be inevitable from the beginning. In the end, 1,893,290 people voted in favour of euthanasia, with only 979,079 against, meaning that 65.1% were in favour of reform.

Although the euthanasia issue is usually presented as one of religious morality, it’s much more complicated than that.

VariableSpecial vote Yes for euthanasia
No religion0.27
Buddhism0.36
Christianity-0.39
Hinduism0.16
Islam0.09
Judaism0.62
Maori religions-0.31
Spiritualism and New Age0.14

It’s true that, as with cannabis law reform, the main opponents to euthanasia were Christians. Perhaps surprising to most, however, sentiments were not particularly strong about the topic in either direction. Although the correlation between being Christian and special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum was significantly negative, at -0.39, this was weaker than the correlation between being Christian and special voting Yes in the cannabis referendum (-0.48).

Spiritualists and New Agers, Buddhists, Hindus, Jews and the non-religious were the most likely to special vote Yes in the euthanasia referendum. These groups don’t tend to have superstitious beliefs about keeping people alive even when terminally suffering, which is primarily a Christian belief, itself a consequence of the Christian non-belief in reincarnation.

VariableSpecial vote Yes for euthanasia
No qualifications-0.73
Level 1 certificate-0.59
Level 2 certificate-0.57
Level 3 certificate0.07
Level 4 certificate-0.60
Level 5 diploma-0.54
Level 6 diploma0.23
Bachelor’s degree0.69
Honours degree0.75
Master’s degree0.75
Doctorate0.61

Underlining the degree to which fear of euthanasia is an irrational one, but not necessarily religious in origin, are the correlations between educational attainment and special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum.

The correlation of -0.73 between having no NZQA qualifications and special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum was much stronger than any correlation between religious belief and special voting Yes, whether negative or positive. This correlation cannot entirely be explained by appealing to the fact that older people, who tend to be more conservative on such issues, tend to also be less well educated (see below).

Likewise, the correlations between having a Master’s degree or an honours degree and special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum were both 0.75. This is probably because educated people have thought about the issue more, and are more likely to conclude that death is nothing to fear, and that forcing the terminally ill to stay alive is immoral.

VariableSpecial vote Yes for euthanasia
Age 20-240.43
Age 25-290.50
Age 30-340.44
Age 35-390.31
Age 40-440.23
Age 45-490.21
Age 50-540.07
Age 55-59-0.10
Age 60-64-0.15
Age 65-69-0.13
Age 70-74-0.12
Age 75-79-0.15
Age 80-84-0.18
Age 85+-0.08

Young people are, of course, more removed from death than older people. This could perhaps lead to them being more blase about the subject. Old people are significantly more Christian than young people, but did not vote against euthanasia in significant numbers. The truth is that euthanasia has reasonably broad support across all age groups.

All of the age groups from 45-49 years old and above had no significant correlation with special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum. This result will surprise some. Old Christians seem to be much less against euthanasia than they were against cannabis – perhaps because law change in the former case threatens to cause suffering to them, whereas law change in the latter case only causes suffering to others.

VariableSpecial vote Yes for euthanasia
No children0.66
One child0.00
Two children-0.12
Three children-0.49
Four children-0.67
Five children-0.65
Six or more children-0.55

One of the strongest correlations was between special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum and having no children – this was 0.66. This can mostly be explained by the existence of a strong correlation between special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum and having no NZQA qualifications.

There was a correlation of -0.67 between having four children and special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum. This might best be explained by reference to the fact that those with four children tend to be less well educated than the average, and the less well educated tend to oppose euthanasia.

An alternative explanation is that those with the strongest pro-life sentiments will both have many children and oppose euthanasia. These sentiments, contrary to popular belief, are far from necessarily Christian. Some will be, but most not.

VariableSpecial vote Yes for euthanasia
Yearly income < $5,0000.03
Yearly income $5,000-$10,0000.14
Yearly income $10,000-$20,000-0.54
Yearly income $20,000-$30,000-0.53
Yearly income $30,000-$50,000-0.60
Yearly income $50,000-$70,0000.12
Yearly income $70,000+0.69

This set of correlations is unusual. They start neutral, then become significantly negative as people become wealthier, and then become significantly positive as people become still wealthier. This is different to the usual monodirectional pattern seen in correlations between e.g. education and income.

Probably this pattern can best be explained by appeal to the fact that the wealthiest segment of the population is also the most highly-educated, whereas the middle-wealthiest segment is the poorest educated, and the poorest segment of the population, because it is mostly comprised of students, pensioners and young workers, is a blend of both.

VariableSpecial vote Yes for euthanasia
Born in New Zealand-0.40

A very curious result is that those born in NZ were significantly less likely to vote for euthanasia. Being NZ-born made a person even more likely to vote against euthanasia than being a Christian did.

This is primarily a function of the fact that NZ-born voters are significantly less educated than foreign-born ones, and poorly-educated people voted heavily against euthanasia.

VariableSpecial vote Yes for euthanasia
NZ European0.13
Maori-0.32
Pacific Islander-0.22
Asian0.28

There were no strong correlations between belonging to a particular race and voting a particular way in the euthanasia referendum. There was a significant negative correlation between being Maori and special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum, and there was a significant positive correlation between being Asian and special voting Yes. However, neither was particularly strong.

Perhaps the most curious outcome here is the fact that Asians were the race most likely to vote in favour of euthanasia law reform, at the same time as being the race least likely to vote in favour of cannabis law reform. This is especially noteworthy given the strength of the correlation between special voting Yes for euthanasia and special voting Yes for cannabis (see below).

VariableSpecial vote Yes for euthanasia
Special vote Yes for cannabis0.74

One of the strongest correlations of all was between special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum and special voting Yes in the cannabis referendum. This is because Yes voters in both instances tended to be young and well-educated. Most people in this category felt that both euthanasia prohibition and cannabis prohibition were antiquated laws that reflected the morality of a bygone age.

The major difference between the two is that those special voting Yes in the euthanasia referendum tended to be foreign-born, whereas those special voting Yes in the cannabis referendum tended to be New Zealand-born.

In summary, those who cast a special vote for Yes in the euthanasia referendum were primarily poorly-educated. They varied greatly in race, income, religion and age, but the strongest correlations with special voting Yes for euthanasia were with educational levels.

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This article is an excerpt from the upcoming 3rd Edition of Understanding New Zealand, by Dan McGlashan and published by VJM Publishing. Understanding New Zealand is the comprehensive guide to the demographics and voting patterns of the New Zealand people.

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If you enjoyed reading this essay/article, you can get a compilation of the Best VJMP Essays and Articles from 2021 from Amazon for Kindle or Amazon for CreateSpace (for international readers), or TradeMe (for Kiwis). A compilation of the Best VJMP Essays and Articles of 2019, the Best VJMP Essays and Articles of 2018 and the Best VJMP Essays and Articles of 2017 are also available.

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